Correcting Chromatic Aberration with Topaz Clarity

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (58 votes, average: 4.57 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered: ,

It is not a feature that every lens is graced with. The ability to bring all wavelengths of color into the same convergence point is ideal with optics in photography, however when these wavelengths of color meet at different positions, the result is chromatic aberration (or color fringing).

Correcting Chromatic Aberration with Topaz ClarityPurple color fringing

Typically a result of a certain focal length or aperture setting, if you ever happen to come across color fringing in a photo you’ve snapped, here is a simple solution on how to fix it using the HSL panel and edge aware masking technology in Topaz Clarity. (If you don’t own a copy, download a free 30-day trial here.)

Continue Reading

Finding Your Photographic Style, presented by Blake Rudis (51:23)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (28 votes, average: 4.54 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered: , , , ,

For every photographer it is important to have a specific style that is genuine to you. This really is not something you can learn…your style essentially finds you and ultimately defines you. Join Blake Rudis as he shows how you can polish and refine your artistic style with several Topaz Products.

Create a Mixed Media Look with Topaz Impression (12:57)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (32 votes, average: 4.81 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered:

Topaz Impression can be a very powerful painting tool in Photoshop. Of course, the single click presets developed by Topaz Labs are great, but there is so much more to it than that!

As many of you know I used to be a painter. One thing painters do is mix different mediums together in one piece, like acrylic paint and water color, or pastels and charcoal. You can do the exact same thing in Topaz Impression and obtain beautiful results!

Purchase Topaz Impression: topazlabs.com/impression

Perfecting Images of People, presented by Joel Wolfson (1:03:38)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (13 votes, average: 4.69 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered: , , ,

Although most of us shoot lots of photos of people, often they’re without the advantage of a studio and professional models. You can still make them outstanding! Join internationally published photographer Joel Wolfson as he walks you through the steps of optimizing images of real people shot in a variety of conditions from candids on the street to informal portraits. Joel will show his techniques using some of his favorite Topaz plug-ins including Clarity, Detail, B&W Effects, and Clean.

The Perfect Custom Preset with Topaz ReStyle (7:50)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (31 votes, average: 4.71 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered:

Blake Rudis is a 3 time self-published author and the founder of EverydayHDR.com & HDRInsider.com. He has also recently developed Zone-Edit.com. This site is devoted to his Photoshop post processing technique that utilizes the limitless potential of the Zone System and the power of Photoshop to capitalize on the contrast in any image.

There are many times when toning a photo can make it pop off the page, give it a unique feeling, or just clean it up a bit. There are several ways you can tone a photograph and there are even more tones that you can apply to the photo. Just take a stroll through ReStyle, there are thousands of tones, but which one is right? Is there a correct tone for a photo?

I would like to think that there is based on the concepts of Color Theory. In a nutshell, in painting, if you mix a vibrant color with a little bit of its complement you will subdue its affect in the composition to create a more harmonious piece. The same is true in photography.

When I tone an image I like to look at the image and see what the predominant color is. I then apply colors with Curves Adjustments that are opposite of the predominant color on the Color Wheel.

The image below is predominantly Blue.  I would look at the color wheel and see what this color blue’s complement is.  I would use either Yellows or Oranges to boost the tone in the photograph.

The Perfect Custom Preset with Topaz ReStyleWith Topaz ReStyle and a couple of Photoshop tricks, we can use this principle to make compelling compositions.

***Be sure to download the action as well as view the video tutorial***

Continue Reading

Transform Your Photo into a Surreal Work of Art

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (78 votes, average: 4.59 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered: , , ,

In this tutorial I will demonstrate how to extract a subject (in this case a tree) from its background using the Color Range brushes in Topaz ReMask.

We’ll then apply selective adjustments by bringing out the tonalities & exposure in the tree using Topaz Clarity, followed by enhancing the tree’s edge texture using Topaz Clean.

To finalize the image, we’ll bring the background into Topaz Lens Effects to create an abstract, dreamy background.

So if you’re tired of your same ole editing workflow and looking to try something new, download the image to the right (or use your own) and follow along!

Don’t own the plugins used in this tutorial? Download a free 30-day trial here.

Continue Reading

Photography Drawing™ (PhtD) with Topaz B&W Effects

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (39 votes, average: 4.28 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered: , , , ,

Guest tutorial by Julia Anna Gospodarou

In this tutorial I will make a demonstration of how I use the Topaz plugins in my Photography Drawing™ (PhtD – in short) workflow and what I consider as the best plugins and features to use when processing a B&W image, a long exposure architectural photograph in my case, so you can get the results I’m getting in my work and that brought me numerous awards and distinctions.

The image I will demonstrate my workflow on is Fluid Time II, from the series Fluid Time which is an image of the Prudence Plaza building, shot in Chicago using a Canon 5D MKIII camera and a Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II tilt-shift lens. The image was shot with 8.5 degrees tilt at 45 degrees rotation of the lens, so to create the characteristic tilt-shift blur on specific portions of the image (upper and lower side of the image, diagonally disposed), and it was realized with the technique of long exposure (121 seconds exposure). To create the long exposure effect I used two stacked ND filters –  10+3 stops in total, the Formatt-Hitech ProStop IRND Joel Tjintjelaar Signature Edition.

Julia Anna Gospodarou_Fluid Time II_2000px_240dpi

Continue Reading

Selective image sharpening with Topaz Detail’s Effect Mask

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (36 votes, average: 4.64 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered:

Image © Robyn Aber

To obtain a crisp and clear photo, image sharpening in Topaz Detail is an applicable solution as it can emphasize texture, bring out details and add depth to your image. However, image sharpening shouldn’t always be applied globally or to the overall photo. Common areas to be cautious of sharpening include:

  • Skies
  • Water
  • Human Skin
  • An out of focus background (bokeh)
  • Areas with evident high ISO noise
  • Areas of constant/flat color

Masking is a valuable tool as it allows you to pinpoint exactly where you want the sharpening adjustments to be applied. For instance, emphasizing a model’s eyes without sharpening the fine lines in her skin would involve masking.

Continue Reading

Awaken the artist within (47:54)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (11 votes, average: 4.45 out of 5)
Loading...

Presented by: Software covered:

“I truly believe that every photographer, and that includes you, has an artist within – an artist that can be awakened in the digital darkroom by using creative plug-ins. An artist that can make your time sitting at your computer, processing your images, more fun. One of my favorite plug-ins is Topaz Adjust. With a click of your mouse and a swipe of a slider, you can transform your pictures into more creative – and professional looking – images.” -Rick Sammon