I have a neat little trick for cleaning up an image in Topaz Adjust that I’d like to share with you. Often you have images that don’t need high-impact adjustments and will actually benefit more from subtle enhancements. For example, the image below is a little dull, washed out and the main building actually has a bit of a blue-green color cast going on… probably from the water and grass.

(Original)

In just a few clicks I was able to go in and quickly clean up the cast, enhance the color and make the image pop – as you can see in the image below. Wish I was there now!

(Final)

So let’s take a look at the workflow…

1. Open your image in Adjust. Once the interface loads click on the “Reset All” button.

Typically, I work start with Exposure and work my way down the tabs in order, but we’re actually going to start our work in the Color tab.

2. So go ahead and click on the Color tab to open it.

3. Turn off all the effects of each slider to disable any enhancements. You should have the same starting values as seen below.

So now you should have a totally desaturated image. (If you are interested in creating high-impact B&W images then check out Topaz B&W Effects)

From here we can start to bring back the image color gradually.

4. Starting with the Saturation slider, slowly increase it to bring back the stronger sources of color in your image. You should have a mix of black & white and color. My final value for the Saturation slider is at 1.89.
The Saturation slider is used to increase or decrease the overall saturation (richness and brightness) of the image.

5. Next, go to the Saturation Boost slider and slowly increase it. The Saturation Boost slider is going to increase or decrease the saturation of less saturated colors in an image. My final value for the Saturation Boost slider is at 0.50.

(Final)

And that’s it. You may want to play around a bit with the Saturation and Saturation Boost sliders to create the optimal balance for your image. Then from there you can go ahead and make any additional adjustments to your image using the Exposure, Detail and Noise tabs.