6. Getting Our Kicks on Route 66 - Hackberry

    My wife and I live near a famous stretch of Rt. 66, Central Avenue in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Starting out from our home city we wanted to visit some of the iconic places left on this road and travel all the way to the California border. Once underway we stopped often to reflect on our national past! So here we are sharing the sights and some of the history on another one of our epic journeys with the help of our good friends at Topaz!

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Article by Guest Blogger Joel Tjintjelaar

TOPAZ DENOISE, THE PERFECT PLUGIN FOR GETTING RID OF NOISE FOR LONG EXPOSURE ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY.

As a black and white photographer specialized in architectural, black and white and long exposure photography, I frequently run into noise issues when taking long exposure photographs. Especially in low light conditions and longer exposures, chances of having noise in your photographs are very likely.

There are several plugins available to get rid of the noise but I’m very picky to what I choose as a tool. Getting rid of the noise is one thing, but retaining all the details, especially in architecture, is another thing. You don’t want to lose all the details, just the noise. And that’s exactly where some plugins are better than others. I need a good balance between reduction of unwanted noise on one hand and retention of details on the other hand. And preferably I need a lot of control so that I can accurately target a specific kind of noise in my image without affecting the rest of the image. For an architectural photographer this balance is essential. I’ve tried many plugins but the last few years I prefer to use Topaz DeNoise as it gives me very good results.

Of course the best thing is to avoid noise, something I succeed in, in the last few years, but it can’t always be avoided. And sometimes I like to add a bit of noise, in especially skies, to get that analog look.

Let’s have a look at a few examples.

Example 1: Visual Acoustics XI – Silence and Light – Pantheon – Rome

Final Photo
Visual-Acoustics-XI---Silence-and-Light---Pantheon---Rome40inch_1500px

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Guest article by Whytake.com

Authors: Alister Benn & Rafael Rojas

Alister Benn and Rafael Rojas are both award winning landscape photographers, experienced guides, instructors and authors of inspiring educational material. By combining their strengths and co-producing the Whytake.com e-modules they have created material that is progressive, innovative and unique in the field of nature photography education.

They are co-authors of – Digital Black and White Landscape Photography

2Light, airy, calm, barren, minimalistic, reflective

One-hundred years ago, making photographs in black and white was a technical limitation; today it is a creative choice. It is somewhat ironic that after a century of scientific development to deliver cameras capable of capturing the world full of rich textures and colors, so many of us have returned to making images in mono. Why would that be?

The 21st century has been a whirlwind of development in both camera/sensor technology and the processing power of our home computers. It is not too bold to suggest that most of our smart phones today are packed with more possibilities than our DSLR’s were a decade ago.

But, as always, contemporary tools are also full of quick fixes and automation, leaving us with both a gift and a curse. The gifts are obvious; speed, efficiency, convenience and not least, being able to bypass a lot of study and craft. However, the flip side of this is that we so often find ourselves handing our images over to the computer and failing to truly understand why it is we are making them in the first place.

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Topaz B&W Effects is often referred to as “black, white and beyond” as it offers many filters that go beyond black and white conversion (Cyanotype, Opalotype and Albumen to name a few of the collections that contain presets outside of the typical grayscale black and white realm).

Photographer and Topaz user Robyn Aber has portrayed this with a single shot of an escalator captured in the Seattle Central Library.  “The Central library has ‘poison’ yellow neon glowing escalators – as you can see in the before shot. They looked very Pop Art-ish to me,” describes Aber. Several derivations were conducted with the original shot shown below from the application of the Topaz B&W Effects collections and filters.

Original image:

cRobynAber2013_SeattleCentralLibraryEscalator_Before-resized

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