The witch and the ogre - Faroe islands

This article is based on the ebook “The Photographic Message“, from Essential Seeing

Special reduction for the Topaz community until 15th March : 20 CHF instead of 25 CHF (use discount code: ESSENTIALTOPAZ)

Creeping shadow - Namibia

Introduction

When we talk about personal photography, we refer to photography being used with the purpose of saying something that reveals the way the photographer connects, understands, and interprets the world. We are all different and unique, and certainly each of us has a very distinct way of relating to the world and its inhabitants, of processing the stimuli we receive, of thinking and feeling, and of making connections and finding conclusions. When we use photography with the intent of showing others (and ourselves) that personal way of connecting with the world, we are not just using photography to show how the world looks to us, but mostly how it feels to us.

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Lofoten, Norway

Introduction

It is very tempting to think that post-processing in photography is something disconnected from the rest of the photographic process, and particularly so from the capture of images in the field. The truth, however, is that post-processing should not be considered a separate step in photography, but rather as the continuation, or should we say culmination, of a whole photographic process which started the moment we had an idea in our mind that we wanted to capture in a photograph.

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Guest article by Whytake.com

Authors: Alister Benn & Rafael Rojas

Alister Benn and Rafael Rojas are both award winning landscape photographers, experienced guides, instructors and authors of inspiring educational material. By combining their strengths and co-producing the Whytake.com e-modules they have created material that is progressive, innovative and unique in the field of nature photography education.

They are co-authors of – Digital Black and White Landscape Photography

2Light, airy, calm, barren, minimalistic, reflective

One-hundred years ago, making photographs in black and white was a technical limitation; today it is a creative choice. It is somewhat ironic that after a century of scientific development to deliver cameras capable of capturing the world full of rich textures and colors, so many of us have returned to making images in mono. Why would that be?

The 21st century has been a whirlwind of development in both camera/sensor technology and the processing power of our home computers. It is not too bold to suggest that most of our smart phones today are packed with more possibilities than our DSLR’s were a decade ago.

But, as always, contemporary tools are also full of quick fixes and automation, leaving us with both a gift and a curse. The gifts are obvious; speed, efficiency, convenience and not least, being able to bypass a lot of study and craft. However, the flip side of this is that we so often find ourselves handing our images over to the computer and failing to truly understand why it is we are making them in the first place.

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